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REVIEW: An Evening with Joan Baez

REVIEW: An Evening with Joan Baez

Joan Baez walked onto the stage like it was a Greenwich Village coffee shop at the height of the 1960's folk revival. On this night, though, she was half a world away from there, and those days happened a lifetime ago. The long, dark hair of her youth is greyed now and cropped short, but her figure still holds it's youthful appearance.

Even after a singing career that has spanned more than fifty years her voice remains as strong as ever, and reminiscent of years gone by. Supported by her backing band, which includes her multi-instrumental son Gabriel Harris, she sang many traditional folk songs, like 'House of the Rising Sun', and Woody Guthrie's 'Deportees'. Her selection of songs added to the sense of nostalgia on the night.

A high-light of the night was Joan's rendition of Bob Dylan's 'It's All Over Now, Baby Blue', in which she encouraged the audience to participate in the closing line of each verse.
"I know this is a Dylan song," she said. " Because I was there when he wrote it."

A lively show, in which she stopped to dance with her son during a musical interlude. It finished with an encore of John Lennon's 'Imagine' in which she was joined by the audience for yet another sing-along.

Review by Peter Beauglehole.

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